Posts Tagged ‘mac’

It seems more than a little odd to us that Apple hasn’t bothered to make FaceTime compatible with its own longstanding desktop video chat service, iChat, but we’ve at least supposed that it’s an inevitability with whatever upcoming Mac OS X update or software bundle that Apple deems appropriate. Now Mac4Ever, who was spot on with a pile of rumors last year, but hasn’t succeeded with its recent prediction of an iLife ’11 launch in August, is saying that Apple is prepping FaceTime both for Mac and PC. We don’t know if that means building a whole copy of iChat for Windows, or just making FaceTime compatible with some existing PC video chat service, but it would certainly improve the odds of us ever finding a legitimate use for FaceTime. (engadget)

XRoar v0.24

Posted: September 10, 2010 in Emulator
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XRoar v0.24 is released.XRoar is a Dragon emulator for Linux, Unix, Mac OS X, GP32, Nintendo DS and Windows. Due to hardware similarities, XRoar also emulates the Tandy Colour Computer (CoCo) models 1 & 2.

XRoar v0.24 Changelog:
* Improved ALSA sound module.
* SDL video module fixes.
* Use target-specific threading code in SDL audio on Windows.
* Special “-tapehack” mode to rewrite tidied CAS files.
* Search worldofdragon.org ROM filenames.
* More accurate slow-to-fast SAM transitions.
* NDS: bring up to date with new libnds.
* NDS: faster video, audio fixes, better file requester.
* NDS: sleep while lid is closed.
* Support direct loading of DragonDOS binaries.
* Implement remaining known illegal instructions.

Download:XRoar v0.24
Source:Here

(emuCR)

Puzzle Agent iPhone

Posted: September 8, 2010 in iPhone/iPad/iPod, PC, Wii
Tags: , , , , ,
The differences between homage, inspired by, and outright copycat narrow as you move down the sliding scale. Telltale Games‘ new Puzzle Agent is obviously born out of a collective admiration for Professor Layton’s awesome DS adventures. And though the desire to emulate a great game is perfectly understandable, Puzzle Agent adheres so close to the Layton formula of narrative-puzzle-narrative-puzzle that it’s distracting. Hell, you even search scenes for pieces of gum instead of coins to activate hints.However, to outright dismiss FBI Puzzle Research agent Nelson Tethers as Layton without a top hat is to partially miss the point. Once the similarities between Puzzle Agent and Professor Layton have been fully digested, you can begin to appreciate the best parts of Tethers’ adventure: the wonderful art style and the interesting story.

Tethers has been sent to the freezing Fargo-like burgh of Scoggins, Minnesota to reopen a shuttered eraser factory. To do so, he must talk to the locals, piece together an increasingly oddball plot, and, as expected, solve puzzles using a very basic – but also accessible – tap-and-click interface. There are over 30 puzzles in Puzzle Agent; the majority of them are required to sniff out the culprit behind the factory closure. They include math puzzles, logic exercises, and spatial thinking tricks.

Arrange the food, Agent Tethers.


To be sure, the weakest link in Tethers’ case is the puzzles themselves, which would have absolutely devastated Puzzle Agent if it didn’t have charms elsewhere. Looking over the list, I see that only half of them really entertained me. Far too often, Puzzle Agent relies on basic shape-arrangement exercises that are not really brain-teasers. And Telltale repeats some of these puzzles entirely too often, such as returning to a snowmobile pathing puzzle where you drop logs to create an escape route. Another offender is tile-rotating. Twist these worms. Spin those stovepipe pieces. Rotate these hiking routes. Enough already.

The logic puzzles are much better, such as an exercise where you must visualize a line of crows to deduce the minimum number of the birds on a wire. The trouble here, though, is that the difficulty of the logic puzzles is all over the map. And the placement of tough puzzles is also uneven. The final puzzle is a great stumper, but it’s preceded by two softballs: follow a cord through a tangle and arrange some objects into a specific shape. There is no danger of getting puzzles (and there are several object-placement exercises throughout the case) like these wrong, which robs Puzzle Agent of suspense. You just sit there and click around until you have the final shape. There’s truly no need to use hints on these types of puzzles, and they account for a lot of Tethers’ teasers. I don’t necessarily want to be beaten over the head, but Telltale leaves the safety net under Tethers for the whole game.

It’s too bad that the core puzzling isn’t as strong as Puzzle Agent’s excellent art direction. Telltale hired Graham Annable, creator of the spectacularly macabre Grickle strips and animations, to design Puzzle Agent’s look. It was Telltale’s most inspired decision in the creation of Puzzle Agent, as this game looks like no other. The simple line art is both evocative and creepy, especially when the storyline – which I enjoyed quite a bit – takes a dark turn.

Puzzle Agent is blurry and washed out.


Unfortunately, this brilliant art is under-served by the porting process from PC to iPhone. Puzzle Agent looks fuzzy and washed out whenever an element is in motion or part of a backdrop. The moment something stops at the center of attention, typically Tethers in a scene, he looks fine. But the saturation and blurriness around him is distracting. Game-killing? No, not at all. But it does a real disservice to Puzzle Agent’s strongest element. (ign)

Published by: Telltale Games
Developed by: Telltale Games
Genre: Adventure
Release Date: US: September 2, 2010
RP for Rating Pending
Also Available On: PCMaciPadWii

Posted: September 8, 2010 in iPhone/iPad/iPod, Nintendo DS/i/3DS, PC, XBOX 360
Tags: , , , , , ,

You would be forgiven for saying you’ve had your fill of tower defense games. The past few years have seen a flood of these strategy clones filling downloadable portals like Xbox Live Arcade. But you know who might be able to bring you back: the good people that brought you Peggle. PopCap, one of the best developers and publishers around, has brought its excellent tower defense game Plants vs. Zombies to XBLA. While it uses the basic mechanics of all efforts in this genre, it stands out for its charm, personality, and loads of gameplay variety. The result is another addictive experience from PopCap that will appeal to all walks of gamers.

Zombies are creeping on your lawn, and your garden is the last line of defense against these brain-crazy cannibals. You have some pretty peculiar (but useful) plants at your disposal, including pea shooters that spit green balls at the undead, hot tamales that burn everything in their path, and Venus zombie traps that will devour an enemy in one gulp. By planting various seeds in strategic locations around your lawn you may be able to hold off the onslaught and keep them from entering your house and eating your brain.

Unlike many tower defense games there isn’t a winding path the zombies follow towards your home. The yard is divided into six rows and zombies shuffle across the yard in a fairly orderly fashion. They won’t cross over into other lanes but you will find multiple bodies coming in on one row. It’s a very simple design and, while it does eventually become challenging, this is one of the easier tower defense games I’ve played. The real draw here is the incredible variety of plants (towers) and zombies. There are 48 kinds of plants with numerous offensive, defensive, and production capabilities, and 26 different zombies. Completing each level in the game will unlock a new plant or item to add to your arsenal. The array of choices means you can customize your strategy and confront the undead on your own terms. These constant rewards really keep you involved and will have you defending your lawn for much longer than you may have expected.

There is also a wide variety of gameplay styles. Some levels take place during the day and some at night, which has a large effect on what plants are available to you, how you harvest sunlight (your resources), and what environmental obstacles you encounter. Interspersed among the regular levels are more arcade-like variations on the tower defense formula. You may lose the ability to select plants and instead have to make do with pre-selected weapons that come down a conveyor belt. Or you may be asked to play Whack-a-Zombie out of the blue. There is also a survival mode to unlock and puzzles that let you play as the zombies. You can’t go more than a few minutes with this game without discovering something new and delightful.

Adding to the game’s charm is the cast of undead, ranging from football players to zombies that carry screen door shields to aquatic zombies that ride dolphins (you have a pool in the backyard). These aren’t your gruesome Left 4 Dead or Resident Evil zombies. This is a zombie game for the whole family (never thought I’d say that). It also has a catchy, organic soundtrack that becomes more intense as your yard is flooded with enemies. The light voice acting gives the undead character as they lurch toward your house grunting and moaning for brains.

The transition from mouse and touch screen controls to a control pad has been handled very smoothly. It’s easy to whisk your cursor around the screen with the analog stick and now you can hold the triggers to suck sunlight in. This version of Plants vs. Zombies doesn’t feel cumbersome at all.

New to Plants vs. Zombies are competitive and cooperative multiplayer modes. Versus mode is particularly fun and lets one player take control of the zombie horde and try to eat their way into their buddy’s house. When playing as the plants, you win by shooting down three of the zombie’s five targets on their side of the screen. It’s great fun. These multiplayer modes are only available locally. PopCap is trying something different with Plants vs. Zombies’ leaderboards on XBLA, and I’m not sure it works. Instead of a list of high scores or game completion percentages, you can show off your house to your Xbox Live friends. A pile of dead zombies will accrue on your lawn and ornaments will appear as you earn achievements, which are supposed to be representative of all you’ve accomplished in the game. As I’m playing the game early for review, I can’t really get a sense of how satisfying it will be to check out my friends’ houses. (ign)

Published by: PopCap Games
Developed by: PopCap Games
Genre: Strategy
Number of Players: 1-2
Release Date: US: September 28, 2010
MSRP: $15.00
RP for Rating Pending
Also Available On: iPhoneiPadXbox 360Nintendo DSPCMac

DeSmuME SVN r3768

Posted: September 8, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , , ,

EmuCR:DeSmuMEDeSmuME SVN r3768 is released. DeSmuME is an open source Nintendo DS(NDS)emulator for Linux, Mac OS and Windows. DeSmuME supports save states, the ability to increase the size of the screen and it supports filters to improve image quality. DeSmuMEalso supports microphone use on Windows and Linux ports, as well as direct video and audio recording. The emulator also features a built-in movie recorder.

DeSmuME SVN Changelog:
r3768
print long filename in console when adding files to fat image

Download: DeSmuME SVN r3768 32bit
Download: DeSmuME SVN r3768 64bit
Source:Here

(emuCR)

DeSmuME SVN r3767

Posted: September 5, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , , ,

EmuCR:DeSmuMEDeSmuME SVN r3767 is released. DeSmuME is an open source Nintendo DS(NDS)emulator for Linux, Mac OS and Windows. DeSmuME supports save states, the ability to increase the size of the screen and it supports filters to improve image quality. DeSmuMEalso supports microphone use on Windows and Linux ports, as well as direct video and audio recording. The emulator also features a built-in movie recorder.

DeSmuME SVN Changelog:
r3767
stop using static ints in #ifs

Download: DeSmuME SVN r3767 32bit
Download: DeSmuME SVN r3767 64bit
Source:Here

(emuCR)

Axon Logic Hackintosh Back in April we heard word of an affordable hackintosh tablet called the Axon Haptic. We were skeptical, since all we had was an anonymous tip and a render — something any 3D concept artist could have cooked up in an hour or two. But now we know that the Axon Haptic is real, you’ll be able to pre-order it this week, and yes, it runs OS X.

Let’s just get right to the juicy part, shall we? The Haptic is designed from the ground up to be compatible with any Darwin OS. That includes several UNIX distributions such as PureDarwin, and of course Apple OS X. Of course, installing OS X on anything other than  Apple hardware is a breach of the license agreement, so Axon Logic (the company that makes the Haptic) strongly urges you not to do it, though of course they are not responsible for how you use the open-source software they include. I, on the other hand, think it’s a great idea.

According to Axon Logic:According to Axon Logic:Besides using only quality components, they are specifically chosen to be compatible with Darwin. That gives you the freedom to run, in addition to Windows and Linux , any* Darwin OS. Darwin and all of its required components such as the mach_kernel and kexts are on an EFI partition to make it effortless to install your favorite XNU/Darwin OS. Just pop in the disk, and follow the directions.Sounds simple enough. But what are these components, exactly? Keep in mind that some of these components are user-replaceable.

Axon Logic Hackintosh specs :

  • 1.6GHz Atom N270 (other trims will be available)
  • 10″ 1024×600 LED-backlit LCD- Resistive touchscreen w/ built-in stylus
  • 2 200-pin SO-DIMM slots (2GB standard)
  • 2.5″ HDD bay (320GB standard)
  • 1.3MP webcam- Wi-Fi (A/B/G/N)
  • 3G SIM slot (AT&T or Verizon)
  • Built-in speaker
  • 3x USB, Headphone, mic, ethernet, VGA ports, card reader- On-screen keyboard and handwriting recognition
  • Removable battery (3000mAh, ~3hrs)
  • 0.9kg (just under 2lb)

Basically you’re looking at a slightly overachieving netbook. Impressive in some ways, disappointing in others. The cost will be $800, or $750 if you get into the beta. To those of you who want to draw comparisons to ModBooks: yes, you can do that, but you’re looking at twice the price or more. That’s not trivial.

Axon Logic HackintoshObviously we would all like a better processor; there are plans to make a “Pro” version that runs on the MacBook Air logic board and a better processor, and of course you should be able to install anything compatible with the socket. But recall that hackintoshes on netbooks last year ran very well on more or less this exact setup. I’m concerned about the weight, but I don’t think there’s any risk people will use this as an e-reader.

As for the touchscreen, I am told that a capacitive one is not a good match with OS X. Maybe so with iOS, but with OS X you want to be able to write, draw, click this pixel and not the one next to it, etc. We’ll see.As for the touchscreen, I am told that a capacitive one is not a good match with OS X. Maybe so with iOS, but with OS X you want to be able to write, draw, click this pixel and not the one next to it, etc. We’ll see.

Here’s a sneaky shot of the device in real life, and what appears to be a screenshot of the desktop. Nice multi-boot setup; with 320GB, you’ve got enough to have a decent-sized partition available, and this might be a great IT carry-around tool.

The question is, will people find this useful? Personally, I think a full-on OS X tablet would be more useful than a  Windows 7 tablet. It’s just my opinion, but it seems that OS X has a more friendly interface for non-mouse interaction. But is it something that is useful at all? Obviously the keyboard will be less useful on the Haptic than on an iPad. Capacitive definitely has the lead there. But if the handwriting recognition is tolerable, that could be a great way of inputting your occasional login, search terms, or quick email. As with the iPad, it’s amazing what you can get used to. One might be tempted to suggest that this will be useful for artists, but Photoshop and other media-heavy programs will chug on that Atom N270. Even on a MacBook Air they’re not the swiftest.

Axon Logic HackintoshI think that by searching for specific things the Haptic will be good at, we’re losing the forest in the trees. It runs OS X! Hello! You have an entire operating system. Browsing and email won’t be much better than an iPad, probably not as good, in fact. But what about all the other stuff you do on your Macs and PCs? You can plug a keyboard into this if you need to write a paper, or a gamepad to play SNES games. You can install Chrome, watch YouTube, whatever.

Ultimately, of course, it’s up to the user whether this is something for them. For some, it’s an unnecessary complication of a simple tablet. For others, it’s too much of a step down from a “real” computer. If an iPad is enough for you, get an iPad. If you need more power, get a MacBook Pro. If you want Windows, get an Lpad. This is just another option in the sea of options out there right now. I’m pretty sure it’s not the solution for me, but I guarantee there are plenty of people out there who are going to love this thing. Head over to Axon Logic (still very much under construction, they tell me) to see more and maybe even pre-order.Update: it does appear to share its form factor with this tablet. Ben from Axon Logic says that the shell was commissioned by them for the Haptic but the company they hired has decided to use it on their own. The guts are different. (tablets)

DeSmuME SVN r3766

Posted: September 4, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , ,

EmuCR:DeSmuMEDeSmuME SVN r3766 is released. DeSmuME is an open source Nintendo DS(NDS)emulator for Linux, Mac OS and Windows. DeSmuME supports save states, the ability to increase the size of the screen and it supports filters to improve image quality. DeSmuMEalso supports microphone use on Windows and Linux ports, as well as direct video and audio recording. The emulator also features a built-in movie recorder. (emuCR)

DeSmuME SVN Changelog:
r3766
libfat improvements: now actually works, and uses fat32.

Download: DeSmuME SVN r3766 32bit
Download: DeSmuME SVN r3766 64bit
Source:Here

DeSmuME SVN r3765

Posted: September 4, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , ,

EmuCR:DeSmuMEDeSmuME SVN r3765 is released. DeSmuME is an open source Nintendo DS(NDS)emulator for Linux, Mac OS and Windows. DeSmuME supports save states, the ability to increase the size of the screen and it supports filters to improve image quality. DeSmuMEalso supports microphone use on Windows and Linux ports, as well as direct video and audio recording. The emulator also features a built-in movie recorder.

DeSmuME SVN Changelog:
r3760
begin rewriting and vastly simplifying compact flash fat generation code so that it is more amenable to bugfixing
r3761
this time without a hardcoded debug write to d:\\test.ima
r3762
fix autodldi in linux and fix attempt to load savestate -1 in linux-cli
r3763
no longer require a reset before auto-dldi works with libfat
r3764
more useful compact flash failure diagnostic printing
r3765
dont crash when you can’t open a scanned fat file

Download: DeSmuME SVN r3765 32bit
Download: DeSmuME SVN r3765 64bit
Source:Here

(emuCR)

GameDB v0.0712

Posted: September 4, 2010 in Emulator
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EmuCR:GameDB GameDB v0.0712 is released GameDB is the newest community and directory for Mac, iPhone and iPod games. Evolving from the Mac Game Database, we strive to bring you easy-to-read game and entertainment information, so you can have fun with your favorite platforms. 

DownloadGameDB v0.0712
Source:Here

(emuCR)