Posts Tagged ‘ps2’

PCSX2 SVN r3750

Posted: September 11, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , ,

EmuCR:PS2 emulatorPCSX2 SVN r3750 is released. PCSX2 is an open source PlayStation 2 (PS2) emulator for the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. With the most recent versions, many PS2 games are playable (although speed limitations have made play-to-completion tests for many games impractical), and several games are claimed to have full functionality.

PCSX2 SVN Changelog:
r3748
Lets go ahead and bring the changes to zzogl-pg in the GregMiscellaneous branch into trunk.
r3749
zzogl-pg: Add the new files to the Windows project.
r3750
zzogl-pg: Sketch out some dialog box changes in Windows for later.

Download: PCSX2 SVN r3750
Download: Official Beta Plugins Pack [09 August 2010]
Source:Here

(emuCR)

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Previewing games can be a funny business. You’re either under the watchful gaze of the developers themselves as they unveil their progeny for the very first time or part of a scrum of people keeping one eye on the game at hand and the other scoping out to see if the lady with the tray of tiny burgers is coming any nearer. In the best case we get to play in the office, although that’s with the constant interruptions of the phone and under the guilt of leaving an untended inbox.

It’s all a far cry from games’ natural habitat – a room full of friends on a lazy Sunday afternoon, everyone feet up and juggling slices of pizza, cans of beer and controllers – but that’s how we got to enjoy the near-final code of FIFA 11 this weekend.

Away from the din of developers reciting feature lists and the overpowering stench of excitement from a convention’s show-floor, it’s possible at last to really see how a game is shaping up and coming together. We’ve already been through what’s new, but this, at last, was a chance to see what really works.

FIFA 11’s not got the benefit of one big new feature to wow people with – there’s no game changer like the 360 degree dribbling that was introduced last year, nor the myriad headline improvements of 09 that helped establish FIFA as the premier football game series. What it does have is refinement and polish alongside countless little advances that do their very best to eradicate any of the faults of FIFA’s past.

There’s none of the dumb-headed positioning from your A.I partners, none of the moments of crass stupidity from your keeper as he lays the ball off into the path of the opposition and none of the frustrations from another cheap chipped goal. Instead, there’s a whole load of quality. Passes are now more technical, requiring a little more thought and a lot more care before spreading the ball around the field, and wide play is now more likely to be rewarded with a crisply met header than before. The result is a game that’s much more reliable than before, and one that steps even closer to aping the flow of the real thing.

It’s got a lot more character than before too. Part of that’s from the new suite of animations as players stumble and falter in their pursuit of the ball, and part of it’s from the improved likenesses across the board. “But Phil Neville looks grotesque” protested a friend. Yes. Yes he does.

The way the personality of each player is reflected in how they play is the most impressive thing, however. On the squad selection screen players have symbols by their names signifying their special attributes; Torres, for example, is both a Speedster and an Acrobat, meaning he’s more likely to perform the spectacular in the box and can sprint with gusto. Gerrard, meanwhile, is a Crosser, Playmaker and Engine among other things, a complete midfielder who can perform at his best for almost the entire 90 minutes. Learn a team well enough and you’ll soon know who can do what and tailor your play accordingly. It’s all the more gratifying when you know the team from what’s just happened on Saturday afternoon.

There’s some more surprising ways that the personality plays out on the pitch. Different referees now officiate the action, each one with their own character; some will reach for their top pocket if you so much as glare at an opposition player, while others will happily let everyone kick seven shades out of each other before so much as awarding a free kick.

Some additions aren’t as welcome though. For the first time handballs are introduced, and it’s unsurprisingly infuriating especially given the frequency with which it occurs. Penalties are often given against you through no fault of your own, and if we weren’t so placid (or, more truthfully, sedated by the blend of warm beer and mounds of melted cheese we’d just imbibed) we’d have destroyed a controller or two. Thankfully it’s optional and defaulted off. We’d recommend you leave it that way.

Otherwise it’s looking like another exceptional outing for FIFA. There’s a lot more to discuss – we’ve yet to scratch the surface of either the new career modes or put a serious spell between the sticks – but all that will come in the full review in the next few weeks. (ign)

  • Published by: Electronic Arts
  • Developed by: EA Canada
  • Genre: Sports
  • Release Date:
    US: September 28, 2010
  • MSRP: $59.99
  • RP for Rating Pending
  • Also Available On: Nintendo DS, PC, PlayStation Portable, Wii, Xbox 360, iPhone, PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3
  • Also known as: FIFA 11

PCSX2 SVN r3744

Posted: September 10, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , ,

EmuCR:PS2 emulatorPCSX2 SVN r3744 is released. PCSX2 is an open source PlayStation 2 (PS2) emulator for the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. With the most recent versions, many PS2 games are playable (although speed limitations have made play-to-completion tests for many games impractical), and several games are claimed to have full functionality.

PCSX2 SVN Changelog:
r3741
Remove some obsolete code relating to VIF/GIF FIFOs (hwRead/Write handlers always intercept them now, so saving values back to the eeHw register mirror is ineffective).
r3744
(u64*) [compilation error fix]

Download: PCSX2 SVN r3744
Download: Official Beta Plugins Pack [09 August 2010]
Source:Here

(emuCR)

PCSX2 SVN r3738

Posted: September 8, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , ,

EmuCR:PS2 emulatorPCSX2 SVN r3738 is released. PCSX2 is an open source PlayStation 2 (PS2) emulator for the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. With the most recent versions, many PS2 games are playable (although speed limitations have made play-to-completion tests for many games impractical), and several games are claimed to have full functionality.

PCSX2 SVN Changelog:
r3738
Minor fix from yesterday’s IPU refactoring (fixes some homebrew stuffs)

Download: PCSX2 SVN r3738
Download: Official Beta Plugins Pack [09 August 2010]
Source:Here

(emuCR)

PCSX2 SVN r3727

Posted: September 5, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , , ,

EmuCR:PS2 emulatorPCSX2 SVN r3727 is released. PCSX2 is an open source PlayStation 2 (PS2) emulator for the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. With the most recent versions, many PS2 games are playable (although speed limitations have made play-to-completion tests for many games impractical), and several games are claimed to have full functionality.

PCSX2 SVN Changelog:
r3724
* Move the GIF register handlers from dmac to hwRead/hwWrite (like the VIF registers they aren’t actually DMA-related).
* Minor cleanups to trace logging and FastFormat string stuff.
r3726
IPU: Split IPU DMA stuff out into its own file, and add missing region info (got left out AGAIN >_<) and a potentially important bit of IPU information to the savestate.
r3727
Changed SIF and IPU macros for hw register mappings into references. (-> into .)

Download: PCSX2 SVN r3727
Download: Official Beta Plugins Pack [09 August 2010]
Source:Here

(emuCR)

PCSX2 SVN r3723

Posted: September 4, 2010 in Emulator
Tags: , , ,

EmuCR:PS2 emulator PCSX2 SVN r3723 is released. PCSX2 is an open source PlayStation 2 (PS2) emulator for the Microsoft Windows and Linux operating systems. With the most recent versions, many PS2 games are playable (although speed limitations have made play-to-completion tests for many games impractical), and several games are claimed to have full functionality.

PCSX2 SVN Changelog:
r3721
debian:
* remove personal rule target: has not worked since last change…
* Some fix to control. Update package std version
r3722
debian: forgot 1 file
r3723
microVU:
– Fixed xmm reg corruption when calling console print functions from recompiler (win-vista+ clobber some xmm regs)
– Tweaked and commented regalloc class

Download: PCSX2 SVN r3723
Download: Official Beta Plugins Pack [09 August 2010]
Source:Here

(emuCR)

This Week on PSN

Posted: August 18, 2010 in Playstation 3, PSP
Tags: , ,

Every Tuesday, Sony drops a bunch of new stuff onto the PlayStation Network. Those with a PlayStation 3 or PSP can download this new goodness, which ranges from retail and PSN games to movies, themes and more. While the Official PlayStation Blog outlines these updates in full each week, we thought we’d help truncate the good news into something more digestible.

First off, we’re gonna give PlayStation Plus subscribers a sneak peek at what’s free and discounted for them as of next Tuesday. Three new free games will be available — Mushroom Wars(PSN), 2Xtreme (PSone), and Vempires (Mini). Additionally, PlayStation Plus subscribers will have access to an early demo of the game TerRover before anyone else. And if you’re looking to save some cash on new purchases, PlayStation Plus users will find discounts for both Soldner-X: Himmelstrurmer and Soldner-X2: Final Prototype (if purchased together for $10.79), or just Soldner-X2: Final Prototype (if purchased alone for the rather strange price of $9.09).

Mushroom Wars will soon be free for PlayStation Plus subscribers.

Sony also wants to make clear that a lot of old PlayStation Plus perks are going to be coming down during next week’s update (when all of the aforementioned new goodies go up), so if you want to jump on any free games or discounts that you haven’t taken advantage of yet, now’s probably the time to do so. Specifically, Critter Crunch (PSN), Syphon Filter (PSone) andKahoots (Mini) will be coming down next week, and can all be copped for free by PlayStation Plus subscribers for one final week. Discounted games and DLC, including PixelJunk Racers 2nd LapEchochrome, and Resistance 2 DLC will also be going back to their normal price next week. So be aware!

Critter Crunch is still free for PS+ users… but only for another week.

So what if you’re just a regular PlayStation Network fiend? Well, we’ve got news for you, too. Top Gun is the new PlayStation Network game available this week, should you choose to drop $14.99 on it (we’ll have a review of this game as soon as we can). Free game demos for NHL 11, HAWX 2 and Joe Danger are also available. And there’s plenty of DLC to be had as well, for games like Uncharted 2, LittleBigPlanet, and ModNation Racers.

PSP gamers — don’t feel left out in the cold! Ys Seven can be downloaded for $29.99 directly to your PSP today, and a demo forPhantasy Star Portable 2 will also be available on the PlayStation Store. If you’re in the mood for a new PlayStation Mini, you can also download Carnivories: Dinosaur Hunter for $3.99.

A nerdy RPG… for RPG nerds!
(ign)

Madden NFL 11 (Xbox 360)

Posted: August 11, 2010 in XBOX 360
Tags: , , , , , , ,

For years Madden has been building features, gameplay modes and control mechanics for the hardcore football fans of the world. It was trying to emulate even the smallest details of NFL football and EA Sports enjoyed lots of success with its endeavors. But in recent years many newcomers were turned off by the complexities that Madden brought to the table. With that in mind EA created Madden NFL 11, an iteration of the series that is built more with the mainstream fan in mind, while still not losing any of the hardcore-focused accoutrements that have made their way into the package in past years.

My biggest concern I have with Madden each and every year is the gameplay. Is it really going to feel and look like the NFL that I know and love? Well, this year’s game comes as close as ever to bringing you every spin move and sternum-rupturing tackle that you see on Sundays. Little touches like deemphasizing the suction of the hit stick so that landing big hits actually feels special are great. As is the dual analog stick control scheme which allows you to perform all the jukes, spin moves and stutter steps you could ask for. It also gives players the ability to pivot their upper-body to guard the ball from incoming tacklers. It all looks cool and works well on the field.

While using the right analog stick for more than simple juking is great, the biggest departure for this year’s Madden in terms of control is the elimination of turbo (on default settings). At first, it’s weird, yes. But before long you’ll forget what using a turbo button felt like. Now your player just adjusts his speed accordingly. Rarely did I find myself outrunning my blockers as the AI was usually sharp enough to make its own changes in speed.

Another great addition in this year’s gameplay is the ability for your AI teammates to actually land successful blocks and hold them long enough for you to utilize them if you can read the defense correctly. You might notice this working almost too well in conjunction with the new right analog control scheme. I had no problems breaking off multiple 300+ yard games on the ground in route to a 15-1 season on the All-Pro difficulty that used to give me trouble in past Madden games.

On the defensive side of the ball, EA Sports tried to turn all of the hot routing and assignment changing functionality you’re used to into something called the Strategy Pad, but the results are a bit frustrating. You navigate through options with the D-Pad, adding one extra button press to access the aforementioned functions. Anyone playing against a fast-paced offense is going to be a bit handcuffed to make their adjustments in time before the snap.

Madden NFL 11 Screenshot

All-in-all the core gameplay on the field is great and looks fantastic in motion. The players have a nice level of polish and they move with the elegance and power you’d expect from top NFL talent. There are still moments when it’s clear that you’re playing a videogame, but mentioning them in a negative light would feel almost nitpicky. The replay system has also been re-crafted to better articulate all of the cool animations on the field. Now if only I could save a replay and share it with my friends (or put it on YouTube), then I’d be truly happy. The fact that so much cool stuff happens is great, but I really want to be able to show non-Madden players what I’m yelling about without having to call someone over to my desk or record something on my cell phone.

For all of the cool gameplay features that have been developed for this year’s game, the most debated will likely be a huge departure for the series called GameFlow. It’s an automated play calling feature that shortens a typical gameplay experience to about 30 minutes (where it used be closer to an hour) by theoretically cutting the amount plays from more than 300 to one. I think if you’re someone who’s new to Madden or if the complexities of figuring out formation types was too much for you in the past, you’re going to enjoy the bulk of what GameFlow does for you. On the flipside, if you’re a hardcore football fan like me who really knows their X’s and O’s, chances are you aren’t going to use the feature all that much. The AI makes some bone-headed play calls that, while they won’t be noticed by casual players looking for a quick game, will likely be lamented by hardcore veterans of the series.

Combating the flaws in your team’s default play selections is a feature called  Gameplanning which lets you assign up to 20 plays to different situations on  both offense and defense and then weight them by preference (sort of like  how iTunes lets you rate songs). Oddly enough I still found that the artificial  intelligence would make a few strange decisions, like picking the deep pass  play All Streaks while my team was on the 15 yard line despite it being  nowhere in my red zone gameplan. It’s these sorts of missteps that will drive  football fanatics up the wall, even if they don’t happen all that often.

So while GameFlow and gameplanning bring both good and bad to the table,  I can happily say that Online Team Play is one of the best gameplay modes to make it into a Madden game in a long time. It allows for up to six players (three on one team, three on another or any permutation therein) to link up online and compete against each other or against the CPU. One person assumes the role of the quarterback, another plays the running backs and the third mans the receivers (one player can also decide to roam to any vacant position) with a similar combination being used on defense. The mode does the unthinkable and actually makes playing on a team with your buddies fun. It’s unabashed couch play at its finest and lends itself very nicely to smack talking friends on your team.

The only negative I can say is that the boosts that are in Online Team Play should have been kept to a simple experience point leveling system. Boosts give veteran players significant attribute boosts which can really ruin the gameplay in my experience. Thankfully a player with a boost looks different than players without a boost in the lobby system, so you can steer clear of them if needed.

Online Team Play is a wonderfully fun and addictive casual mode, but it seems to have come at the expense of any innovations to the two franchise modes (online and offline) and the Be An NFL Superstar Mode. Being a lover of Franchise Mode, it really hurts me to have to suffer through the same exact package that was in last year’s game. Especially since that was a barebones offering to begin with.

EA Sports did take the time to beef up a few of the presentation elements that were missing from last year’s game. Gus Johnson has replaced Tom Hammond in the commentator’s booth and provides easily the best voice I’ve ever heard in a Madden game. His intensity brings a lot to the experience, even if the technology running under the hood leaves something to be desired. His speech is still too fragmented, which is probably a symptom of this being his first year on the job. I’m sure they’ll expand and give him different ways to describe the same event so you don’t get an identical piece of dialogue on every long run. This is certainly an impressive start to Gus’s tenure in Madden, I just want more of his awesome intensity.

The other big addition in the way of presentation elements is new Super Bowl celebrations that do a great job of delivering the weight of the event. Winning the biggest game in football no longer feels like any other Sunday. Now Gus delivers team-specific commentary to let you know that what you just accomplished is something special. Oh, and Obama makes an appearance. How cool is that?

  • Published by: Electronic Arts
  • Developed by: Tiburon
  • Genre: Sports
  • Release Date:US: August 10, 2010
  • MSRP: $59.99
  • E for Everyone
  • Also Available On:Playstation 3, PSP, Wii, PlayStation 2, iPhone, iPad, Xbox 360
  • Also known as: Madden 2011

(via ign)